Our fledgling little business is only just a few months old, and still has a lot of growing to do.  But we knew from Day 1 that we wanted Light to Light Camps to be an enterprise that did more than just take people on (amazing) adventures.

From the years that I spent in Eden I know that the people here expect nothing less of their local businesses, whether it’s sponsoring the local footy team, donating prizes to a raffle, or digging deep whenever a neighbour is in need.

Jenny, Arthur and I have a strong love for this area, and so we wanted to create a business that loved the area, too. We love the beautiful environment here, and so we want to protect that environment. We love the character of the towns and their people, and so we want to do what we can to preserve that character, and support those people.

Jenny, Arthur and I have a strong love for this area, and so we wanted to create a business that loved the area, too.

I’ve always thought the best businesses and brands were those that stood for something. I just don’t have a whole heap of admiration for people who use their talents and energy for the sole purpose of making money. A truly rich life requires something else.

And business people are often well-placed to make decisions that have positive impacts on broader society, whether it’s how they treat their employees, where they spend their profits, the impact they have on the environment, or by exerting pressure on politicians and other businesses to do the right thing.

Light to Light Camps is the first business I’ve had a personal stake in, and so I’m excited to now be able to follow the lead of companies I admire, like Patagonia, that talk the talk and walk the walk on issues that are important to them.

So if you know a local nonprofit that embodies some of the values described above, get in touch with us. Maybe we can work together.

That’s why we’ll be donating 5 percent of all profits from Light to Light Camps to local conservation and education efforts. As well as traditional protection and restoration work, we also want to support nonprofits that are providing opportunities for people to learn about the environment, and that are improving access to outdoor recreation for underserved people and those with disabilities.

So if you know a local nonprofit that embodies the values described above, get in touch with us. Maybe we can work together.

And I hope that we can contribute to this community in other ways, too, by training and hiring local people, supporting other local business, and by being a leader in growing the regional tourism economy. A rising tide lifts all boats, and we believe that the success of other tourism businesses on the Far South Coast contributes to our success, and that our success contributes to theirs.

Perhaps the truest reason has nothing to do with business at all.

Of course, this is a business decision, too. Even the best eco-tourism business is only as good as the environment that is its product. And, like any responsible business, we want to take care of our supply chain – pristine beaches, clean water and air, healthy ecosystems.

And, although I’ve given a lot of reasons here, for why investing in this community is so important to me, perhaps the truest reason has nothing to do with business at all.

Perhaps it’s my 3-year-old son. When he is my age I want him to know this spectacular natural world, too, and I don’t think it’s going to stay the same for him unless I fight for it.

A former editor of the local paper, Jake Lynch left Eden in 2006 to follow his heart, and general sense of adventure, across the United States to work for recreation and community development nonprofits. But some opportunities are just too good to pass up, and he was very easily lured back to join the Light to Light Camps team in 2016.